Consumption of instant noodles is increasing in Asia. Fortifying wheat flour with vitamins and minerals may improve nutrient intake in Asia.

Ongoing consumer demand for ‘optimal nutrition’ and more personalisation is spurring new product innovations. Arwika Ussahatanon, food and communications specialist, explains.

Fortifying foods is not a new trend, but it is a move that manufacturers are commonly adopting now, whether to address deficiencies in vitamins and minerals for consumers, or to enhance the appeal of their products with these added health benefits. But what exactly is fortification, why do we need to fortify foods, and what can be said of the future for fortification? Lee Wei Xuan, research analyst, Euromonitor International, tells APFI more. By Michelle Cheong

Nutrition remains a widespread problem in the world today, regardless if one has access to food or not. To target this, it is not only important to make sure people have enough food, but also that they have the required knowledge on nutrition to make informed choices about their diets. Food manufacturers can do much more to ensure this, as well as make end-products healthier to improve consumer health. By Michelle Cheong

APFI About Us

Asia Pacific Food Industry (APFI) is Asia’s leading trade magazine for the food and beverage industry. Established in 1985, APFI is the first BPA-audited magazine and the publication of choice for professionals throughout the industry with its editorial coverage on the latest research, innovative technologies, health and nutrition trends, and market reports.

Asia Pacific Food Industry is published by Eastern Trade Media Pte Ltd. The company owns numerous trade and consumer titles, including Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News and Industrial Automation Asia.

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