Seven beverage manufacturers in Singapore will reduce the sugar content in all of their drinks to 12 percent and below by 2020, according to the country's Ministry of Health (MOH).

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in Thailand submitted a bill to legislate for a maximum of 10 percent sugar and sweetener content in food and drinks by 2018.

Growing awareness of health and desire for wellness in modern lifestyles are leading to increasing consumer demand for reduced sugar or sugar free food and beverages.

While still craving sweetness, consumers are more wary of high-sugar products that include or add artificial ingredients. Manufacturers can make use of stevia to sweeten beverages naturally and in a healthy way. By Dina Yeon, marketing manager, Sweetness Springboard, Ingredion Asia Pacific

Drinks producer Lucozade Ribena Suntory will reformulate its beverage portfolio to contain less than 4.5 grams of total sugar per 100 ml by July 2017.

Sugar-sweetened beverages are on the rise in most low- and middle-income countries, but a study showed this may not sustain.

APFI About Us

Asia Pacific Food Industry (APFI) is Asia’s leading trade magazine for the food and beverage industry. Established in 1985, APFI is the first BPA-audited magazine and the publication of choice for professionals throughout the industry with its editorial coverage on the latest research, innovative technologies, health and nutrition trends, and market reports.

Asia Pacific Food Industry is published by Eastern Trade Media Pte Ltd. The company owns numerous trade and consumer titles, including Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News and Industrial Automation Asia.

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