Barry Callebaut Publishes Forever Chocolate Progress Report 2018/19

Thursday, December 12th, 2019 | 613 Views


Barry Callebaut has announced that in fiscal year 2018/19 it sourced 47 percent of the cocoa and 54 percent of the other ingredients it uses sustainably. This sourcing achievement is highlighted in Barry Callebaut’s Forever Chocolate Progress Report 2018/19, its third progress report since the launch of its Forever Chocolate plan in 2016, tracking the Group’s progress towards making sustainable chocolate the norm.

Our pilot project in Indonesia looks at enabling farmers to develop their farms into rehabilitated, diverse, professionally run farms.

Antoine de Saint-Affrique, CEO of the Barry Callebaut Group, said: “With over half of our ingredients coming from sustainable sources, we are well on track to have 100 percent sustainable chocolate by 2025. This is a great achievement and it demonstrates that sustainability is at the heart of our business strategy.”

Pablo Perversi, Chief Innovation, Sustainability and Quality Officer, Global Head of Gourmet, of Barry Callebaut: “In the past fiscal year, we focused on big innovative projects that we know will create the tipping point for a sustainable chocolate supply chain. Our progress report shows that this focus is working, creating tangible impact on the ground for cocoa farmers, cocoa farming communities and all the other players in our supply chain.”

Forever Chocolate is based on four ambitious targets, to be achieved by 2025, that address the largest sustainability challenges in the chocolate supply chain:

  1. More than 500,000 cocoa farmers will have been lifted out of poverty[1]
  2. Eradicate child labor[2] from the supply chain
  3. Become carbon and forest positive
  4. Have 100 percent sustainable ingredients in all products

 

Milestones achieved in 2018/19:

 

100 percent sustainable chocolate by 2025

Of all the agricultural raw materials Barry Callebaut sourced, 51 percent were sustainably sourced in 2018/19. The Group sourced 47 percent (2017/18: 44 percent) of its cocoa beans through sustainability programs. Furthermore, Barry Callebaut sourced 54 percent (2017/18: 44 percent) of its non-cocoa agricultural raw materials sustainably. This includes the use of sustainability certification schemes for the respective ingredients.

 

More than 500,000 cocoa farmers have been lifted out of poverty by 2025

In order to have more than 500,000 cocoa farmers lifted out of poverty by 2025, the Group is mapping the cocoa farms in its supply chain. As of end 2018/19, the Group had full data on 176,984 farms and their farmers entered into its Katchile database. This database provides key insights into the location, farm size, socio-economic and household data of cocoa farms and their farmers. This data allows Barry Callebaut to offer tailor-made advice at individual farm level on how to improve productivity via Farm Business Plans and Farm Services.

 

Eradicate child labor[3] in the Barry Callebaut supply chain by 2025

Barry Callebaut rolled out child labor monitoring and remediation systems in its direct cocoa supply chain that now cover 42 farmer groups, including 16,710 farmers, in Cote d’Ivoire and Ghana. Including the farmer groups that have monitoring and remediation systems in place administered by third parties (i.e. UTZ Certified), in total 26 percent of the farmer groups the Group directly sourced from in 2018/19 had systems in place to prevent, monitor and remediate child labor, an increase of +116 percent. 37 percent of the cocoa and non-cocoa volume Barry Callebaut sourced from third-party suppliers had equivalent child labor monitoring systems in place.

 

Become carbon and forest positive by 2025

In pursuit of its target to store more carbon emissions than it produces by 2025, Barry Callebaut reduced in 2018/19 its corporate CO2 equivalent (CO2e) footprint from 9.10 million tonnes to 8.49 million tonnes in fiscal year 2018/19 (-6.7 percent), whilst achieving +5.1 percent volume growth.

The main drivers of this achievement were reduced CO2e emissions from land use change, reduced CO2e intensity in factories and reduced CO2e intensity in dairy products. The CO2e intensity per tonne of product also decreased from 4.45 to 3.92, and additional contributions from scope 3 insetting projects lowered this even further to 3.88 (-13 percent). Of the Group’s factories, 17 out of 62 are now running on 100 percent renewable energy.

 

[1] Number of cocoa farmers lifted out of poverty measured against the World Bank’s USD 1.90/day threshold for extreme poverty.
[2] According to the International Labour Organization, not all work done by children should be classified as child labor that is to be targeted for elimination. The term ‘child labor’ is often defined as work that deprives children of their childhood, their potential and their dignity, interferes with their schooling and is harmful to their physical and mental development. Activities such as carrying heavy loads or using chemicals are considered as ‘unacceptable forms of child labor’ because they are physically dangerous for children.
[3] According to the International Labour Organization, not all work done by children should be classified as child labor that is to be targeted for elimination. The term ‘child labor’ is often defined as work that deprives children of their childhood, their potential and their dignity, interferes with their schooling and is harmful to their physical and mental development. Activities such as carrying heavy loads or using chemicals are considered as ‘unacceptable forms of child labor’ because they are physically dangerous for children.
[4] https://cocoainitiative.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/ICI-CLMS-Effectiveness_15_May.pdf.

 

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